Archives for category: fiber art

Fabulous ideas for watercolor landscapes that can be easily translated onto fabric.

My twin sister sent me this book for my/our birthday-thank you Jenny!

Thanks to Ann Blockley for offering a wealth of ideas in how to create dramatic effects-practical and inspirational.

A great way to add spontaneous color to enhance your narrative embroideries.

 

 

The Foothills Art Council and the Yadkin Valley Fiber Center present New Works by Tapestry Weavers South.

The Studio Gallery

110 North Bridge Street

Elkin, NC 28621

June 3-August 21 2022

Slide Show:

Equilibrium #2 by Jacqueline Mehring

Cat’s Eye by Betty Hilton Nash

Vista by Connie Lippert

In the Garden by Joan Griffin

Journey by Jennifer Sargent

Wedge Weave by April Carter

Vista by Connie Lippert

Migration by Genie Greenlaw

Voices 3 by Terry Bryson

Fiesta,Fiesta by Louise Halsey

Study in Yellow and Blue by Mary Jane Lord

Blue Poodle by Mary Jane Lord

Spirit Journey by Betty Hilton Nash

Wandering but not Lost by Louise Halsey

Equilibrium# 4 by Jacqueline Mehring

Workshops from January -May 2022

Weaving Miniature Tapestry Portraits at HirschWellnessNetwork.org

In this ongoing workshop, enjoy creating a miniature tapestry of yourself, a loved one or beloved pet!

We will weave on a small cardboard loom to explore and enjoy this relaxing and therapeutic art form. Warp and weft yarns are provided, and participants are encouraged to use their own yarns and threads in their tapestries.

Granddaughter

The inspiration for the tapestry “Fellow Americans and Exotic Aliens” came from Bob Sober’s exhibition at the Imperial Center for Arts and Sciences in Rocky Mount, called Small Wonders: insects in focus.

His monumental photographs were awe inspiring in their beauty and dignity. Two adjectives that I would not normally apply to insects. One of the insects photographed, the yellow nose clown lantern fly has a sibling in the USA- the spotted lantern fly which is now the scourge of Virginia and has recently migrated into North Carolina too. These insects are known as exotic aliens.

Before my daughter and I became American citizens, we were designated as legal aliens. There seems to be similarities between the attitudes towards citizens who are called ‘aliens’ and ‘alien’ insects and plants. One of the reasons that exotic insect and plant aliens are regarded as pests is because they have no “natural enemy” in their new environments to keep their populations under control. Once established, some of the exotic aliens can overcome some of the native species.

The yellow nose clown lantern fly
Bob Sober composes his insect portraits from hundreds or even thousands of photographs stacked into a single digital image….then prints the composite images at a relatively monumental scale in comparison to the minute subject matter; some prints in this exhibition are more than 6′ tall…”




woven in two pieces, symetrical but not identical
the yellow nose clown lantern fly in the Garden Fence Gallery

 

Not as large as the monumental photographs of Bob Sober, but this yellow clown nose is still much larger than life.
And obviously would not survive being outside in winter.

Ilustrations of Haitian spirit flags from Spirits in Sequin: Vodou Flags of Haiti

This book was my inspiration for my valentine card from my previous blog entry.

I highly recommend this book to anyone who has an interest in the beautiful sequined and beaded flags of Haiti. The illustrations above are all spiritual flags of the Vodou religion with Haitian symbols of their Gods and beliefs.

However, there are artists who create sequin and beaded pieces that do not refer to the Haitian religion and these works of art are called art flags.

After reading Nancy’s book-my first trials experimenting with sequins

For those of you who would like to try creating art flags inspired by “Spirits in Sequins”- the Dollar store has some great selections of sequins in some beautiful colors. My first pieces were sewn on white cotton fabric, and now I sew on different colored felts and add embroidery stitches.

Detail of Mandala from the heart sutra

Hello, February 2022

My latest embroideries are inspired by the Haitian art flags of dazzling colors and shining sequins.

Harmony from the Heart Sutra

My first piece was a mandala from the heart sutra and that led naturally to the heart for Valentine’s Day

The weathered butterfly

I read somewhere that Wabi Sabi can be expressed as appreciating the beauty of the imperfect, impermanent and incomplete in nature.

Wabi=the loneliness of nature and sabi= the weathering force of nature

I wanted some tears in the wings like you sometimes see in butterfly wings at the end of the Summer season to show the weathered force of nature. Then I stitched the tears together to hold it together, incomplete and imperfect.

Drawing inspiration from the beautiful embroidered work of Hillary Waters Fayle, we created our own embroidered botanical embroideries with magnolia leaves.

I love the connection with nature as well as the idea of impermanence.

Hillary says that some of her main stitches are running stitch, back stitch and couching.

two of my embroidered leaves

I tried all 3 stitches- and added seed stitch from our stitch embellishment class

Thanks to everyone who came to the workshop on May 13th!

“I shall be telling this with a sigh

Somewhere ages and ages hence:

Two roads diverged into a woood, and I-

I took the one less traveled by,

And that has made all the difference.”

Robert Frost.

I thought the weaving would be over once I had woven the 16 tapestry pieces. Wrong! I have to edit to make the shapes fit and make sense. At least, make sense to me.

Before sewing the pieces together, I want the pieces to make sense individually and as a whole.

I don’t like the top part of the 6th tapestry piece

So I am reconstructing the 6th piece. Now I see other areas in tapestry I might reconstruct. I might want to improve or restore sections.

Would it have made sense to have planned this out in more detail?

Absolutely. The road not taken.

Korean masters – 김윤선 색실누비 장인 /심현철기자 shim@koreatimes.co.kr

Beautiful Saeksil Nubi from Kim Yoon-Sun’s studio in Anguk-Dong from : Saeksil Nubi: colorful quilting. The Korean Times.

Korean masters – 김윤선 색실누비 장인 /심현철기자 shim@koreatimes.co.kr

One of the challenges of teaching textile techniques is finding new fiber and textile techniques to play with. Luckily, there is a whole world of beautiful and inspirational embroidered and quilted fabrics in the Folk Art tradition just waiting to be explored.

Maugis

Reconquering Burgundy, resurrecting Charles the Bold

Cooking Without Limits

Food Photography & Recipes

Photography Art Plus

Photography, Animals, Flowers, Nature, Sky

jltstudios.wordpress.com/

Fibre art by Jean Ottosen

NC Alternative Crops and Organics

art in fibers and fabric

around the garden

art in fibers and fabric

studiotempera

art in fibers and fabric